pull it off (to)

 Succeed.
 ► “However, WALL STREET is not so sure the company can pull it off. The rush into new markets comes at a time when trouble is brewing for MCI’s core long-distance business.” (Fortune, Oct. 2, 1995, p. 107)

American business jargon. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • pull sth off — UK US pull sth off Phrasal Verb with pull({{}}/pʊl/ verb [T] ► to manage to do something difficult: pull off a feat/miracle/deal »It takes skilled negotiators to pull off a deal like that. »It s an ambitious plan, so let s see if we can really… …   Financial and business terms

  • pull something off — ACHIEVE, fulfil, succeed in, accomplish, bring off, carry off, perform, discharge, complete, clinch, fix, effect, engineer. → pull * * * informal succeed in achieving or winning something difficult he pulled off a brilliant first round win * * *… …   Useful english dictionary

  • pull something off — tv. to make something happen. □ I didn’t think he could pull it off. CD It takes a lot of skill to pull off something like that …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • ˌpull sth ˈoff — phrasal verb to succeed in doing something that is difficult Hanley pulled off a surprise victory in the semi final.[/ex] They nearly managed to get the loan but just failed to pull it off.[/ex] …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • pull it off — cause it to happen; succeed, win, snatch victory...    With Jean as leader of the party, the Liberals can pull it off. They can win the election …   English idioms

  • pull something off — Syn: achieve, fulfil, succeed in, accomplish, bring off, carry off, clinch, fix …   Synonyms and antonyms dictionary

  • pull yourself off —    (of a male)    to masturbate    See also the more common pull the pud(ding) …   How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • pull something off — informal succeed in achieving or winning something difficult. → pull …   English new terms dictionary

  • pull oneself off — Go to beat off …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • off of — This complex preposition is found in Shakespeare • (A [= I] fall off of a tree 2 Henry VI ii.i.98) and occurs in colloquial speech in AmE: • The night Wayne came at Randolph with a hammer to pull him off of Mary M. Golden, 1989. It is, however,… …   Modern English usage


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